C-130K Hercules

Who flys the Hercules C-130K C1/3

The workhorse of the RAF’s Air Transport (AT) fleet used primarily to carry troops, passengers or freight.

  1. 47 Squadron
    RAF Brize Norton

The main role of the Hercules C-130K is Tactical Air Transport (TacAT), including airborne delivery of personnel or stores by airdrop.

The aircraft is particularly valuable in its TacAT role as it can be operated from unprepared and semi-prepared surfaces by day or by night and allows response to crisis situations, such as evacuating UK nationals from war zones. C-130K aircraft may also be used to carry troops, passengers or freight and are capable of carrying up to 128 passengers (Mk 3)/92 passengers (Mk 1); or 15.9 tonnes of palletised freight/vehicles for up to 1,200nm (Mk3) or 17.4 tonnes/1,050nm (Mk1). The freight bay can accommodate a range of wheeled or tracked vehicles, or up to 7 pallets of general freight.The C-130K is capable of operating in the aeromedical evacuation role where up to either 93 (Mk3) or 70 (Mk1) stretchers can be carried,depending on the mark of aircraft and the stretcher configuration.

Specifications

  • Engines: Four Allison T56-A-15 turboprops
  • Thrust: 4,200shp each
  • Max speed: 310kts
  • Length: 29.77m
  • Max altitude: 32,000ft
  • Span: 40.38m
  • Aircrew: 6

 

The C1 and C3 aircraft are used primarily to carry troops, passengers or freight and are capable of carrying up to 128 passengers, or 20 tonnes of palletised freight or vehicles, for up to 2000nmls. The freight bay can accommodate a range of wheeled or tracked vehicles, or up to seven pallets of general freight. In the aeromedical evacuation role either 64 or 82 stretchers can be carried, depending on the mark of aircraft and the stretcher configuration. The maximum unrefuelled ferry range is 3500nmls, which can be extended to over 4000nmls by air-to-air refuelling. The other main role of the C-130 is Transport Support (TS), which is the airborne delivery of personnel or stores by airdrop. In this role the aircraft supports airborne operations conducted by 16 Air Assault Brigade by the aerial delivery of paratroops, stores and equipment. The aircraft is particularly valuable in its TS role as it can be operated from unprepared and semi-prepared surfaces by day or by night.

The majority of aircraft are fitted with defensive infrared countermeasure equipment, whilst some aircraft used for special tasks have an additional, enhanced defensive-aids suite comprising a Skyguardian radarwarning receiver, a chaff and flare countermeasure dispensing system and a missile approach warning system. The C3 is also equipped with station-keeping equipment, which enables the aircraft to maintain its airborne position in a large formation in thick cloud or bad weather where the other formation members cannot be seen. The aircraft are receiving an ongoing avionics, electrical and structural upgrade, which will enable them to remain the workhorse of the AT fleet into the next decade.

Hercules recognition

Four turboprops located under the high-set straight wing. A circular fuselage with a distinctive nose radome (1), undercarriage fairings and upswept tail to accommodate the large rear loading door. The Hercules often carries fuel tanks on under-wing pylons (2), and at some angles these may appear to be another pair of engines. The C3 version has a 15ft/4.58m longer fuselage (3).


In flight

Hercules C-130K in flight
airspace
Introducing Atlas A400M

Atlas is an extremely flexible aircraft that will provide both Tactical and Strategic Airlift Capability.

Text size:
medium|
larger|
largest